Graphic Novel Title
Godzilla 2000: Millennium
Story & Script
Hiroshi Kashiwabara, Wataru Mimura and Mondo Takimura
Artist(s)
Mondo Takimura
Publisher
Language
Tentomushi Comics
Japanese
Year of Release
Pages
1999
168
Colors
Cover
-
N/A

Changes From the film

- As with most manga adaptions of Toho cinema, Godzilla 2000: Millennium boasts numerous differences from the film version of the same title.

Monster Appearances:
Aliens, SDF, & Misc:
Godzilla, Orga
UFO, Millenian, Type 90 Tank, Full Metal Missile Launchers, Type 96 APC, AH-1S Helicopter, F-15J Jets
Comments

Perhaps one of the "better-known" Godzilla manga, this adaptation of Godzilla 2000 Millennium (1999) is, in many ways, much better than the actual film, and takes many an "artistic liberty," on a similar level with Shogakukan's Heisei series adaptations. The artwork is much very anime style, and presents a nice version of Godzilla. Overall, the story resembles the plot of the film, yet seems to move into it with the intention of improving that which was dull, uninteresting, or just odd. For example, there is a good deal of attention paid towards the Millenian race itself, this time not appearing as a huge tentacled monster, but as an amalgamation of humanoid beings wanting to be reborn in a new world. Interaction even occurs between the Millenians and the human heroes in the form of a stand-off between a sort of "clone" of Io. Godzilla himself, and well as Orga, fight much, much more fiercely in this version. Also, a new sub-plot is brought up revolving around Io's mother, thus Shinoda's wife; something never used in the film, adding to the over higher intensity that the manga creates in this adaptation of what was something of a lackluster film.

-Matt Frank