I have been reviewing Godzilla curries for almost five years now, so it has begun to feel as if it is something of a standard dish—whenever I see a boxed Godzilla food item, I always assume it is another instant curry. Such was the case when I picked up the Tokyo Oshima Godzilla Mabudofu Mix (ゴジラ麻婆豆腐)—the box looks just like one of the many Godzilla and kaiju curries out there. The box design of this one looks especially like the first Godzilla curry I reviewed—the Yokosuka Godzilla Curry back in 2016.

But no, finally we get a new spicy Godzilla dish, and mabudofu is a great choice! Mabudofu is a Chinese comfort food frequently seen at Chinese restaurants in Japan. While high in calories and salt, it is also delicious and often quite spicy. One of my favorite dishes that I used to eat while living in Chiba was a Sichuan mabudofu at the local Chinese place—it was incredibly spicy, made me choke sometimes, and I loved it!

The product in this case comes in a box featuring Burning Godzilla from Godzilla vs. Destoroyah (1995) with fiery splotches splattered in the background.

Tokyo Oshima Godzilla Mabudofu Mix

Check out that stylish box design!

The sell text proclaims that Godzilla has resurrected from Mt. Mihara, and that the tofu dish has “sweetness and spiciness that will hit you in the chest!” In other words, it’s probably the last thing I should be eating, at least on a regular basis! Still, while I find myself mostly eating lots of nuts, vegetables, hummus, and lentils these days, I allow the occasional indulgence, and this was one of my indulgences some time ago.

The ingredients in the bag include pork, soy sauce, garlic, Chinese chili oil, salt, and many other pastes and sauces mixed together. The back of the box proudly proclaims that the mix includes togarashi spice sourced from Izu Oshima (an island). Their variety of togarashi spice is apparently more fragrant and spicy than the normal kind of togarashi spice you can pick up at the grocery store. The salt also is sourced from the same island, and from Hanarejima—specifically from the black waves of the sea.

One bag nets you 270 calories, 7.8 grams of protein, 17.3 grams of fat, 19.4 grams of carbohydrates, and a whopping 5.5 grams of salt.

The box contains a sort of foil bag inside, just like the instant curries, but the Godzilla Mabudofu Mix requires slightly more prep than the curries do. In the case of this hot Chinese dish, you must prepare about 200 grams of tofu, then slice them into 1.5 cm pieces and fry them up in a frying pan. Add the contents of the bag and mix them together with the tofu and let heat permeate the mixture thoroughly. Add green onions and Chinese chili oil to taste. The box says that the mixture should be two servings, enough for two people—which may be true if you both have a small appetite.

Tokyo Oshima Godzilla Mabudofu Mix

My apologies–I am no professional chef!

I dutifully prepared the suggested ingredients, adding the green onions and mixing in a bit of extra chili oil. And I have to say, while I probably will never eat this dish again in my life, it’s one of the better-tasting kaiju kuisines I have had so far. While certainly not up to the standards of the better mabudofus I have tasted at restaurants, it has a solid kick without being overwhelmingly hot (for my palate), yet also providing a rich mix of flavors to please the tongue. Green onions provide a nice extra crunch.

While not at all healthy, the Godzilla Mabudofu Mix provides a savory, pleasantly spicy treat for those lucky enough to pick up a box. Recommended for a rare monster snack, though certainly not as an everyday meal.

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