I bought the Godzilla Mint Can “Tokyo” (ゴジラ ミント缶) back in 2019 or so, figuring I could write a review of the little guy for some time… but I was never quite sure what to say about the thing. Unlike some of the more elaborate Godzilla foods from yesteryear (like the Valentine’s sweets), the Godzilla Mint Can is quite… normal, and the actual mints are thoroughly unremarkable. Not bad—they are serviceable mints and taste fine, but the main attraction to this product is the steel can itself, and what you can come up with to use it for after the mints are gone.

The Godzilla Mint Can cost 972 yen, and the can itself easily fits in the palm of the hand, and includes a small plastic bag of tiny individual mints. The can came in three varieties—one with a stylized Godzilla face and “65” written out in kanji, signifying Godzilla’s anniversary; a second with a gold background and a cartoonish Godzilla biting down on a train above the English phrase “since 1954”; and the most boring of the three (plus the one I actually got my mitts on) featuring what appears to be a CGI depiction of the King of the Monsters charging up his nuclear breath and beginning to turn towards the camera. This latter Godzilla is depicted in color, and seems to be ShodaiGoji, or the original Godzilla from the first film.

Godzilla Mint Can (Tokyo) Review

The mints inside are very small, hard candies with a strong mint flavor. They are satisfyingly minty and, given that they are so small, you get a great many of the little guys in there. The flavor did not strike me as being particularly unique, or to be referencing something greater in the Godzilla universe. I don’t believe for a moment that they fizz like the Oxygen Destroyer. Perhaps, if one wants to be especially generous, one could say that they reference Godzilla’s glowing blue-electric back fins—maybe Godzilla has a minty mouth-feel when he is blasting buildings with his nuclear breath. This seems like a stretch, though; most Godzilla snacks and foods are spicy, which feels like the opposite of mint, but perhaps these tiny candies might be a good follow-up to a case of Godzilla curry breath.

The main attraction of the product, as mentioned earlier, of course is the can itself. The can is quite sturdy, and made from steel; the image on the cover is clear, and it’s stylish. The cover slides off to reveal the mints, though sometimes I found it a little hard to get it to open. Once the mints are gone, they can easily be replaced by generic mints or something else small that can fit in the rather shallow space inside. I can imagine the case being used as a means for hiding a key or other small valuable. Maybe you could use it to propose to your kaiju-loving girlfriend.

Definitely one of the lesser Godzilla goods, and not worth its high price tag, but if you can find some use for the can after enjoying kaiju-fresh breath, some fans might find the Godzilla Mint Can a good purchase. Just don’t go in with high expectations for an imaginative and playful design.

Godzilla Mint Can (Tokyo) Review

Ingredients, if you can read them

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