Giant Octopus 大ダコ


Giant Octopus - Giant Octopus (2nd Generation)
Giant Octopus
Giant Octopus

Length : 30 meters
Mass : 600 tons

Powers / Weapons

Constricting tentacles

Appearances

King Kong vs. Godzilla (1962)

Series // showa


Description

On the remote Faro Island, a young native boy named Chikiro was told to procure some narcotic berry juice in order to assist the treatment of Kinsaburo Furue. The boy rushed across the rocky shore and made his way into a relatively large, grassy hut. In the distance behind him, his mother called out as she searched for her child. Little did either the boy or his mother know that something else was approaching the hut. The slithering sounds of a giant octopus slowly became audible as it appeared from behind a small hill. Inside the hut, Chikiro's mother located and reprimanded the boy, but the terrifying sight of the collapsing roof completely shifted her attention. The giant octopus had climbed onto the hut, seeking the berry juice inside.

Several hundred meters away, the Faro Island natives and the members of the TTV expedition came to learn of the awful situation. The islanders grabbed their spears, as Osamu Sakurai grabbed his firearm. The natives arrived on the scene and tossed their spears as Osamu fired upon the gigantic octopus. As the humans continued their campaign against the monster, Chikiro and his mother escaped the collapsing hut. Suddenly, a primal roar was heard... King Kong, the legendary ape, appeared behind a towering fence. He ripped the wooden gateway apart and threw the detached pieces at the octopus. The great ape approached the creature and lifted it, only to have the abomination latch onto its head. King Kong finally threw the octopus to the ground, and it slithered away as the gargantuan gorilla threw two boulders at its head. The defeated creature retreated toward the shore, and likely to the sea from whence it came.


Powers / Weapons
Constricting Tentacles

Constricting Tentacles

The Giant Octopus has eight arms, each lined with strong suction cups to help the creature hold its prey.

When King Kong attempted to attack the mammoth cephalopod, the Giant Octopus latched onto Kong's face. The giant ape had to use considerable strength to dislodge the octopus, throwing it to the ground afterwards.


Background and Trivia
  • As is common with multi-generation kaiju, most sources list the Giant Octopuses as having the same stats. In fact, the Godzilla 1954-1999 Super Complete Works (ISBN: 4091014704) is one of the few sources that lists out the stats for the Giant Octopus that appears in King Kong vs. Godzilla (1962). In this instance, the kaiju is 30 meters in length and only 600 tons. In contrast to the second generation, the first is very light. It's hard to say how large it is in contrast, since one gives the size in length and the other in height. As a side note, one 2005 publication, Godzilla: Toho Monster Picture Book (ISBN 4092800525), does merge the stats for the two. It gives the Giant Octopus a length of 30 meters, like the first, but a mass of 20,000 tons, like the second.
  • The effect work for the Giant Octopus was a combination of using real life octopuses mixed with props and also some minor claymation. The real octopuses have a bulk of the screen time in the movie, either filmed directly or using super imposition techniques while objects were placed on top of them, such as thrown boulders or spears. The props were primarily used for segments that involved having King Kong in the same shot, such as when Kong throws the gate at the octopus or when the cephalopod latches onto Kong. An exception is the sequence that features a close-up of King Kong's face while a real octopus' tentacles move on top of it. The final technique, claymation, is used only via one of the tentacles as it picks up a Faro Island native and swings them around.
  • The special effects crew got the real live octopuses and brought them to a beach near Tokyo for filming. At the beach, the crew created the models needed for the Faro island sequence and then attempted to film the cephalopods. Unfortunately, the octopuses were not cooperative, even when using sticks or hot air to try to move them in the manner the crew needed. Eventually the miniatures were packed up and filming was finished at the studio. According to Teruyoshi Nakano, special effects director Eiji Tsuburaya ate one of the octopuses after shooting was finished, as noted in the publication Japan's Favorite Mon-Star.
  • A lot of footage of the Giant Octopus was reused later as stock footage for Eiji Tsuburaya's Tsuburaya Productions on the show Ultra Q in 1966. The reused scenes, primarily of the real life octopus footage, were converted to black and white and cropped to a 1.33:1 aspect ratio. The footage is a place holder for the monster Suda in the episode Rage of the South Sea.


Giant Octopus (2nd Generation)
Giant Octopus (2nd Generation)

Height : 25 meters
Mass : 20,000 tons

Powers / Weapons

Constricting tentacles

Appearances

Frankenstein vs. Baragon (1965) [cut scene]; The War of the Gargantuas

Series // showa


Description

Attacking a cargo ship among the darkness and fog, the Giant Octopus sought to feed its insatiable hunger. Its meal was cut short however. Rising too from the thrashing waters, a towering green beast took hold of the multi-limbed adversary. Gaira, the green gargantua, born from the cells of Frankenstein himself, was attacking the beast that had killed its father. The slimy behemoth was completely overpowered by the giant's omnipotent strength. With little care, Gaira hurled the tentacle kaiju away. The vicious Gargantua sent the octopus into retreat, back into the black and safe confines of the ocean's depths.


Powers / Weapons
Constricting Tentacles

Constricting Tentacles

The huge cephalopod is equipped with eight arms, each appendage featuring numerous suction cups that help it to hold its foe in place.

The Giant Octopus used its tentacles to try and search the deck of the fishing vessel for food. When the green gargantua emerged, the appendages were used to latch on and attack Gaira. The assault was unsuccessful, as Gaira was able to use his strength to dislodge and throw the cephalopod.


Background and Trivia
  • This version of the Giant Octopus was modeled by Murase Tsugizo along with the brothers Koei Yagi and Kanji Yagi.

  • The second generation of the Giant Octopus first appeared in a cut scene from Frankenstein vs. Baragon (1965). This cut scene, which was not featured in theatrical prints in Japan or the United States, has appeared on numerous home video releases and television broadcasts in Japan. For a description for his role in this sequence:

    Giant OctopusScreaming his victory to the countryside, Frankenstein cast down the freshly killed Baragon into the valley below. However the humanoid kaiju's triumph would be short lived. Hearing a horrible sucking-like noise, Frankenstein turned and looked on as an enormous octopus shambled over the rocky landscape. How or why the cephalopod demon was so far inland completely baffled the crowds of surviving humans that looked on, as the two monsters prepared to lock in battle.

    The human behemoth wasted no time and rushed to meet the sea beast head on. He first tried hurling rocks, but these had little effect against the octopus' muscled hide. Frankenstein next moved to combat his opponent at close range, a move that would cost the giant in the end. Unable to cope against the kraken like beast's many limbs, Frankenstein found himself being dragged to a nearby cliff. Onlookers watched in complete disbelief and horror, when both monsters fell into the sea. On land Frankenstein might have had a chance, but in the sea he was completely helpless. Against an animal born from the sea, it wasn't long before he was dragged down into the cold depths, screaming his death cries into the waves.

    The giant octopus would resurface for human eyes a year later. Attacking a fishing boat among the darkness and fog, the creature sought to feed its insatiable hunger. Its meal was cut short however. Rising too from the thrashing waters, a towering green beast took hold of the multi-limbed adversary. Gaira, the green gargantua, born from the cells of Frankenstein himself, was attacking the beast that had killed its father. The slimy behemoth was completely overpowered by the giant's omnipotent strength. With little care, Gaira hurled the tentacle kaiju away. The vicious Gargantua sent the octopus into retreat, back into the black and safe confines of the ocean's depths.

  • According to Teruyoshi Nakano, who was the assistant special effects director on Frankenstein vs. Baragon (1965), the scene with the Giant Octopus was created after principal photography on the 1965 film had already been completed. The running time for the production was several minutes shorter than the American distributor had wanted and an extension to the climax involving the mammoth cephalopod was added to the film. This fact is found in the 1996 publication Age of the Gods (self-published).
  • The time line for Godzilla Against Mechagodzilla (2002) and Godzilla: Tokyo S.O.S. (2003) involves several Showa era films. It is noted that the Giant Octopus appeared in 1965 in this time line alongside Frankenstein and Baragon. Consequently, it's likely that Frankenstein vs. Baragon (1965) with the alternate ending is canon to its continuity. This revelation is noted in the 2003 publication Godzilla X Mechagodzilla X Mothra: Tokyo S.O.S. Fantastic Collection.
  • The prop created for the second generation of the Giant Octopus was later reused in Tsuburaya Productions' Ultra Q show in 1966. Appearing in the episode Rage of the South Sea, it was used to represent the monster Suda which also featured stock footage of the King Kong vs. Godzilla (1962) version of the character.