Movie List
Monster Bios
Aliens & SDF
Staff of Toho
Actors
DVDs
Blu-rays
Soundtracks
Video Games
Books
Comic Books
Toys
Animation
Television
Box Office
Posters
Concept Art
Pictures
Cutting Room
News
Release Dates

Articles
Interviews
K.W.C.
Media
Toons
Reviews

Forums
Search
Site Staff
Updates
Title
 Tokyo Blackout
International Title
 Tokyo Blackout
Music By: Maurice Jarre
Record Label: Bourbon
 
Running Time: 43:07 Discs: 1
Release: January 1987 CD Number: 32BTC-152
Comments
Anthony Romero
Here is an interesting score. Created by world famous French composer Maurice Jarre, best known for his work on Lawrence of Arabia and Doctor Zhivago, the soundtrack to this 1987 production features many of the composer's trademark touches. For those familiar with Jarre, his composing techniques were, for their time, fresh and riveting. Displaying a contemporary charm while still conveying a timeless sense for scores such as the previously mentioned Lawrence of Arabia. Sadly, none of that praise can apply to Tokyo Blackout.

While it's a notable anomaly to see a non-Japanese composer on a soundtrack from the country, especially one of Jarre's pedigree, the ending result is fairly forgettable. The score does exhibit some of Jarre's normal style, including heavy use of the piano and a contemporary sense, directly tying it into the 1980's from which it was produced. This contemporary sense is especially apparent on tracks like "Against the Danger II", which favor a more electronic means of composition. A few tracks do avoid these more modern techniques, such as the piano solo track "Ballad of Love", although Jarre commits his best work to this particular score for those cues that drench in the style of the decade. Despite sounding ludicrously outdated, the "Fight" theme here is a pretty fun track that does convey a sense of energy, something the rest of the soundtrack sorely lacks, although it sounds more fitting for a video game score. The rest of the score is fairly forgettable, though. Many of the cues weave into similar motifs used elsewhere, giving some segments a slightly monotonous sense. Some composers do electronic scores very well too, such as Isao Tomita, but here it simply seems to make the entire proceeding feel very "budget oriented", like a made for TV feature.

Overall, there is nothing too special about this particular soundtrack. It's very rare on today's market, and commands top dollar on the occasion that it does show up, but its value is more from its scarcity than anything else. Still, despite its short runtime, it does appeal to those who like music from this particular decade, as the CD displays a lot of work that is distinct for this period of scoring.
Rating:
Tracks
  1. Tokyo Blackout
  2. Delight
  3. Against the Danger
  4. Against the Danger II
  5. Ballad of Love
  6. Against the Danger III
  7. Delight
  8. Fight
  9. Tokyo Blackout II
  10. Desparation
  11. The Dawn of Hope
  12. Clouds of Darkness
  13. Tokyo Blackout III
  14. Ballad of Love II