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1950's-1960's :: 1970's-1980's ::1990's-2000's

Article: 7
Date:
5/18/08
Decades: 1950's-1960's

Godzilla (1954)

 Company: Video Treasures - Vestron Inc. (1983)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

This is the 1983 Vestron Video release of Godzilla (1954), which is quite possibly this film's very first stateside release. The cover features a colorized still of Godzilla, while the rear summarizes the movie and mentions the presence of Raymond Burr. The dubious claim that Godzilla is 40 stories tall seems to be derived from the infamous dubbing error, but the "pretty Japanese lady scientist" line is the real head-scratcher of the synopsis. Also featured is an out-of-place still of Godzilla from Godzilla vs. Megalon (1973).
Credit: Michael Calhoun

Godzilla (1954)
 Company: VIP Video Club (1983)
 Country: France
 Category: Clam Shell
 Supplemental Inclusion: French Poster
Released by VIP Video Club in 1983, this French VHS of Godzilla (1954) is basically a cross between the Japanese and US versions of the film. The runtime is 8 minutes longer than the latter, so the story has more detail and fewer scenes with Raymond Burr. It should be noted that this release is fully dubbed in French (no dialogue remains in Japanese). The quality of the dubbing and of the transfer are quite excellent. The synopsis on the rear of the case roughly translates to the following, "Awakened accidentally from from his million year slumber by atomic experiments, Godzilla emerges from the Pacific to devastate Tokyo in a nightmarish revival of the flames of Hiroshima." This video cassette includes part of the original French poster, and on the back, one can find images of the original US lobby cards.
Credit: Baptiste Pujolle

Godzilla (1954)

 Company: Paramount/Gateway (1992)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

This is the one. The classic. The King. While the description on the back pretty much sums up the idea of the American version of the original Godzilla movie, at the end it seems to come off as a recommendation for watching the film. The cover sports a slightly-altered illustration of Godzilla's famous Japanese poster stance (albeit the slime-green coloration of the King of Monsters). Also note the appearance of strange, small electric currents trickling off of Godzilla's spines. The cover boasts Godzilla savagely melting a fighter jet in his very hand whilst Tokyo burns behind him (take note of the sinking bridge, taken straight from the film).

An illustration of Raymond Burr's character, reporter Steve Martin, is seen in the front sternly clenching his pipe in his mouth, completely oblivious to the wanton destruction occurring right behind him. Also take note of two characters from Son of Godzilla (1967) present at the bottom left of the front cover, Goro and Riko. Although, Riko looks slightly altered, making her more masculine and aged-looking. The usual caption sprawled along Paramount's Godzilla releases is replaced with a simple "Monster Classic". Overall, the cover doesn't sport as many errors as other releases, but still retains the corny atmosphere of the others.

Credit: Shounen_Goji

Godzilla (1954)

 Company: GoodTimes Home Video (1995)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

In 1995, Goodtimes released the American version of Godzilla (1954), known as Godzilla, King Of The Monsters. On the front cover, instead of using the Godzilla from the movie, they used the Godzilla from Terror of Mechagodzilla (1975). Holding a train car in his hand, he stands in front of a generic city skyline.

The title of the movie is cut in two parts. The first part, "Godzilla", is located at the top, mixed with caps and lower-cased light green letters. The second part, "King Of The Monsters", is located across the bottom, all in caps, colored in red, and with a yellow outline.

On the each side of the box is the title of the movie, all in black. Godzilla's name in the title is written like the one on top of the front cover.

On the back of the cover, in the background, is a generic city skyline. If you look closely at the buildings on both the front and back cover, you can see that they are the same. The title of the movie is cut into two parts again. "Godzilla" is located under the summary, and is written and colored like the one on the front cover. "King Of The Monsters" is located at the left side, all in caps, and colored in black. On top of the back cover, there are the words "Hail To The King", colored in black.

One thing to note in the summary is that it states this film ‘has spawned twenty sequels'. Depending on exactly when this VHS was released in 1995, it could have actually been twenty-one... although it is more likely that (since Godzilla vs. Destoroyah (1995) was released in December of that year) that there were only twenty fully-released sequels at the point this VHS was released.

Credit: "Kaiser Ghidorah"

Godzilla (1954)

 Company: Filmax Home Video (1998)
 Country: Spain
 Category: Clam Shell

Released by Filmax Home Video in 1998 to cash in with the US GODZILLA (1998), this cover features a popular production still of Godzilla chewing a train, with the film's title in Spanish: "Godzilla, Japan beneath the Monster's Terror". Quoted are both Steven Spielberg and Quentin Tarantino (quite possibly to raise attention). The back cover shows a fistful of stills from the movie, as well as its full cast and crew; and also a very vague synopsis. This was the first time the film was released uncut in Spain. Filmax has brought several Tokusatsu films to VHS in its original aspect ratios and has managed to pull the best a VHS can give in terms of quality, only hurt by the fact these films are horrendously dubbed in Castilian.
Credit: Hank Xavier

Godzilla (1954)

 Company: Simitar Entertainment, Inc. (1998)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

The year 1998 was a big year for Godzilla, as the American movie GODZILLA (1998) was about to be released in theaters. For this reason, Simitar and other companies were releasing Godzilla films on video in massive quantities. One of Simitar's releases was the American version of Godzilla (1954), known more commonly in the US as Godzilla, King of the Monsters.

The front cover seemingly emulates the Godzilla from The Return of Godzilla (1984). At the very top are the words, ‘The Original Godzilla Movie'. This quote makes it seem like that this is the original Japanese version, which it isn't. The title of the movie is cut into two parts: ‘Godzilla' is located up at the top and ‘King Of The Monsters' is located down at the bottom. Each side of the box displays a thumbnail version of the art work from the front cover, along with the movie title.

On the back cover, between the movie title and summary, are the words, ‘In original glorious Black and White'. There are three pictures from the movie. The first picture is Godzilla firing his Atomic Ray, the second features Steve Martin (Raymond Burr), and the third still reveals Godzilla amidst a burning Tokyo.

In the summary, it states that, ‘Dr. Serizawa has discovered a weapon that could destroy all life in the bay-including Godzilla. But which disaster is worse, Godzilla's fury, or the death of Tokyo Bay?'

Credit: "Kaiser Ghidorah"

Godzilla (1954)

 Company: Simitar Entertainment, Inc. (1998)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover
 - DIGITALLY REMASTERED EDITION -

The case for the digitally remastered version of Godzilla (1954) boasts very few aesthetic differences from its non-digitally remastered counterpart of the same year. The front cover image is expanded (the artwork of which is, by the way, a stunning piece with no unneeded distractions); the rear cover features a greenish, textured background; and finally, all of these changes are punctuated by Godzilla's so-called "Stamp of Approval". Content-wise, this release features a video art gallery, a collection of trailers, and also a documentary.
Credit: Michael Calhoun

Godzilla (1954)
 Company: Classic Media Inc. (2002)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover
This is Classic Media's release of the American version of Godzilla (1954), starring Raymond Burr. The cover shows Godzilla roaring over a blurry image of a city. In the background, Steve Martin, Emiko Yamane and Dr. Serizawa are looking down at the beast. Also in the background, there are some stills of Godzilla peering into a birdcage and Godzilla grasping a train in his enormous maw. One thing that should be noted in the description is that it says Godzilla is a 400 foot Tyrannosaurus rex. Of course, Godzilla is far from looking like a T-rex in any way, and is less than half the height listed (although the dub is misleading in this regard).
Credit: Gyaos


Godzilla (1954) and Godzilla vs. Megalon (1973)
 Company: GoodTimes Home Video Corp. (1996)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover
The first thing to notice about this particular 2-pack slip cover is the lavish, yet cheesy layout. Godzilla faces off against Megalon, spouting a stream of flames amidst the vista of a rocky atoll near an unknown, possibly Pacific island (while the blurry and greenish facade of the King of Monsters himself fades into the flame-colored sky above the combatants). The front of the cover also sports some pretty cheesy Microsoft Powerpoint-esque fonts.

The back of the cover features some strange movie "covers" for the featured films. The first of the films' synopses (which are expectedly corny and somewhat erroneous) is accompanied by a tweaked image of the Megaro-Goji (colored a bluish-green) standing in front of a generic city skyline while holding a train car, while the cover for the entire 2-pack itself is utilized for the other synopsis' still.

Credit: Shounen_Goji

Godzilla (1954), Terror of Mechagodzilla (1975), and Godzilla Trailers and Sci-Fi Monsters (1998)
 Company: Simitar Entertainment, Inc. (1998)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover
In 1998, Simitar released a 3-tape set of Godzilla (1954), Terror of Mechagodzilla (1975), and their own exclusive: Godzilla Trailers and Sci-Fi Monsters (1998). The illustrations for the two included movies are rendered quite well, and the tapes themselves are recorded in EP mode (as opposed to Simitar's minority of SP Godzilla releases). The bonus video includes a fine documentary of sci-fi trailers, represented on the case by more of Simitar's signature artwork.
Credit: Michael Calhoun

Seven Samurai (1954)
 Company: Public Media Home Vision (1994)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover
This mid-1990's cover for Akira Kurosawa's Seven Samurai (1954) almost sells the movie too much with its praise, which is saying something for a film that is generally regarded as one of the best Japanese movies ever made. Generous amount of critical quotes aside, this release was an uncut, two VHS release of the movie that featured the film in its original Japanese with English subtitles.

Godzilla Raids Again (1955)

 Company: Video Treasures, Inc. (1989)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

The front features an unusual artist's conception of one of the most famous publicity stills from this film., The description on the back is a nice short summary of the film, although the ongoing confusion of what each species is actually called continues as Anguirus (here called "Angilas") is referred to as an "Angilosaulus". This print is rare as it actually features the "Gigantis" title card.
Credit: Brandon Lusk

Godzilla Raids Again (1955)

 Company: Westcoast Motion Pictures (Year Unlisted)
 Country: Chile
 Category: Clam Shell

Westcoast's cover for Godzilla Raids Again (1955) features artwork that was used in some US releases of the film; with a drawing of Heisei Godzilla's head (Trendmasters-style) added in the corners. For some reason, the synopsis contains spoilers (such as Anguirus' death) and states that Anguirus had attacked Japan before. There is also a poster for Godzilla (1954) being used as a kind of extra (quite inappropriately too). The running time listed is 82 minutes, yet the featured film happens to be the US version of film, which runs under 78 minutes. A US trailer for King Kong vs. Godzilla (1962) (also released by Westcoast) is shown before the film begins; a nice gesture from the company (and possibly the only redeeming factor of this release, which even has spelling mistakes in the subtitles).
Credit: Hank Xavier

Half Human (1955)

 Company: Rhino Home Video (1990)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

Half Human has gained notoriety among kaiju fans for its obscurity. Ishiro Honda's original cut has never been released on video outside of bootlegged tapes. Unfortunately, the inferior Americanized version is the only cut available, and even that's become hard to find. In recent years, this tape has become a collector's item for Japanese and American fans who want to catch a glimpse of this rare Toho classic. (On a side note, my copy of the tape was purchased from a library, and the box was cut into several pieces to fit in a clamshell case. Using Photoshop, I was able to restore the slip cover to its former glory.)

The front cover, while somewhat simplistic, is also rather stunning. The monster artwork is from the film's theatrical poster, and it's nicely accented by yellow rays. The two taglines (also from theatrical ads) paint an evil portrait of the monster, although the creature is more or less depicted as being a misunderstood prehistoric hominid in the film itself. Aside from a few typos, the synopsis on the back (from Michael Weldon's Psychotronic Video Magazine) accurately describes the film. Of course, this being the Americanization, none of the Japanese cast is credited. The runtime is listed as 78 minutes, however the film itself is only 63, give or take a minute for promos on either side of the movie.

Credit: Cody Himes

Half Human (1955)

 Company: Panda Films (1993)
 Country: France
 Category: Clam Shell

Released by Panda Films under their “Ze Craignos Monsters” collection in 1993, Half Human (1955) is a film that was never released theatrically in France. This version features dubbing by American actor John Carradine, and the film is subtitled in the French language. Unfortunately, the image quality of this print is rather poor. Jean-Pierre Putters, who wrote the summary on the rear cover, is none other than the founder of the famous French magazine "Mad Movies", which is devoted to horror films the world over.
Credit: Baptiste Pujolle

Rodan (1956)

 Company: Vestron Inc. (1983)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

Vestron's 1983 release of Rodan (1956) comes in a box that features the titular monster soaring over the Saikai Bridge (showing off his incredible wingspan in the process). The back cover gives a summary of the movie's plot, while a still photo sits at the top right hand corner. While not the "original creature feature" as the box dubiously claims, it certainly is a classic and is well represented by this VHS cover.
Credit: Michael Calhoun

Rodan (1956)

 Company: Video Treasures, Inc. (1989)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

The second release of this title on VHS in America, this video cassette by Video Treasures was distributed in the late 1980's. It features stunning artwork, liberties taken with the title creature withstanding, that would become the mainstay of their releases at this time. Despite being distributed by Video Treasures, which would eventually become Anchor Bay, the back of the cover credits Vestron with their 1983 release. This likely means the film was licensed through them.

Rodan (1956)

 Company: HGV/Video Treasures, Inc. (1989)
 Country: Canada
 Category: Slip Cover

This is the slip cover for the 1989 release of Rodan "The Original Creature Feature" from HGV and Video Treasures for the Canadian market. The cover, which pictures Rodan being fired upon by some jet fighters and barely being missed by a rocket (which, judging from the scale, is as big as one of the fighters) looks like a hand painted, retouched amalgam of various images from the film itself. We have the name "Rodan" in orange lettering just above the tag proclaiming that this is - The original creature feature! - in rather nondescript black font with an exclamation point.

The back of the sleeve has two pink framed lobby card photos side-by-side over the name "Rodan" and the now familiar catch phrase: - The original creature feature! - A synopsis of the film is included and it is fairly accurate, although the last time I checked Rodan was slightly more than a 100 tons and had a wingspan that was closer to 400 and not 270 feet. Also, the Meganulon are curiously labeled caterpillars.
Credit: CommanderJoe

Rodan (1956)

 Company: Paramount/Gateway (1992)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

In 1992, Paramount and Gateway brought several well known Toho films to home video, including the first Godzilla film and this one, Rodan (1956). This has always been one of my favorite video covers and I'm glad to review it here.

The front artwork is nothing short of amazing. Rodan is depicted trashing a Japanese city as the JSDF hopelessly tries to halt the monster's approach. In the foreground, the artist depicts Kenji Sahara, Yumi Shirikawa, the married couple killed by Rodan, and several others, including one that looks like Akihiko Hirata's doctor character. The title is rendered in the typical "monster" font used on all of these Paramount/Gateway releases.

Of course, the spine is naturally the title under a bordered version of the art featured on the top. The red font really clashes with the green and yellow background, however. The back, too, is similar to the other Paramount/Gateway releases of Toho films. There is a great picture of Rodan facing off against some Japanese tanks (which actually appears to be hand drawn!) The synopsis is a fantastic blend of the seriousness of the film and the tongue-in-cheek approach the company was noted for using in subsequent descriptions. It all ends with a quote from Shigeru's soliloquy at the film's finale, but it's too bad the film is spoiled from all this.

Credit: Cody Himes

The Mysterians (1957)

 Company: Star Classics Inc. (1989)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

R.K.O.'s dubbed version of The Mysterians is becoming increasingly hard to find. This cassette, released by Star Classics, features a terrific image of Moguera destroying the Japanese countryside as people flee in the foreground. In fact, the image stretches onto both sides of the case. Star Classics employees must have really enjoyed this film, judging from the amount of exclamations present on the case. The back of the cover has two oddly-colored publicity stills from the film and an entertaining synopsis, along with a three-star rating from the NY Daily News (presumably from a review during the movie's 1959 American release). The synopsis also praises Ishiro's Honda's impact on the monster movie genre, although his name has been translated incorrectly once again ("Imoshiro", a typical mistake for unseasoned translators). While the movie inside is certainly not in pristine condition (perhaps suggesting an unauthorized release), the case is spectacular for the mid-80s. This tape is a must-have, if only for the now "lost" English version.

Credit: Cody Himes

Varan (1958)

 Company: VCI Home Video (1990)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

Most likely the first VHS print of the Americanized version, this release features a different back and an uncropped poster in comparison with the 1994 release. The rear cover displays a publicity still not seen in the actual film, and contains the odd quote "move over Godzilla", as if to indicate this film was not only superior, but also produced by a competing studio.
Credit: Brandon Lusk

Varan (1958)

 Company: VCI Home Video (1994)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

Released in 1994, the VCI release of Varan the Unbelievable features a cover that shows off the titular kaiju rising from the lake in all its glory while ripping out a tree and sending fleeing people through the air in a fashion that would make Peter Jackson proud. The sides both feature Varan the Unbelievable in bloody text with the top being crowned by a shot of Varan's head. The back of the release features a rather decent synopsis of the film with a picture of the two main characters and a nice head shot of Varan at the bottom.
Credit: Monster Master

H-Man (1958)

 Company: Columbia Pictures Home Video (1988)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

The first (and only) time the H-Man (1958) was put on VHS in the United States, this 1988 release features a front cover that shows a mass of people running from the city. This would have been a fitting cover for one of Toho's famous kaiju films, but for H-Man (1958) , it just seems out of place. Another strange aspect of this release is that the sides don't match. While one has the same purple background as the rest of the release, the other side is all black with even a different font used for the title. This wasn't the first time Columbia Pictures had done this, for their 1980's release of the American horror movie Blue Monkey and famous Ray Harryhausen classic Mysterious Island also feature different sides. As for the back cover of H-Man (1958), it features three black and white shots for the movie, but none actually feature the titular H-Man. It's also rather strange they'd decide to use black-and-white stills for all three shots when the film is presented in full color. The synopsis on the back is also rather hazy and features a few mistakes such as saying the creatures were made of water and lived in water.
Credit: Monster Master

The Human Vapour (1960)

 Company: Prism Entertainment Corporation (1986)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

The front features a grainy screenshot from the film, showing the title character pre-vapor strapped to a table. The shot is disorienting because Mizuno is really strapped down horizontally, but in the cover shot the picture is reoriented as if he is hanging from the wall. The synopsis text included on the back identifies the eponymous monster as the "Astro-man," a being who is "capable of existing forever in outer space" -- thus implying that the Human Vapour is an alien, which is not the case. Where the copy writer got the name "Astro-man" is also a mystery; maybe he simply couldn't remember the title character's name and decided to use whatever came to mind.

The Bad Sleep Well (1960)

 Company: Home Vision Cinema/Janus Films (1998)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

A fairly late VHS release of The Bad Sleep Well (1960) from Home Vision Cinema, which debuted in 1998 just as Criterion and Janus Films started releasing the Akira Kurosawa titles on DVD. This tape from the company, who would later become Image Entertainment, is in Japanese with English subtitles to aid viewers. The cover itself is a little bland, but shows honest effort in its creation utilizing several effects.

Mothra (1961)

 Company: GoodTimes Home Video Corp. (1988)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

As with most GoodTimes releases, this Mothra (1961) cover is an eye catching drawing of the adult Mothra climbing over the ruins of Tokyo Tower. Flames lick the bottom of the cover as explosions erupt beneath the demonic visage of Mothra. The sides of the cover have nothing special, just a continuation of the artwork from the front of the vhs. The back has two impressive pictures topping the synopsis outline. One is the larva form, now covered over with a green skin tone, and the other is of the all the scientist in their suits, huddled around the infant girls. Most of the writing is correct in the paragraph summary of the movie ,with the exception of the goof of calling the twin girls the “Ailenas".

Mothra (1961)

 Company: GoodTimes Home Video Corp. (1988)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

A variant cover released by GoodTimes, and apparently the inspiration for the design of the Columbia/TriStar release several years later, this box adopts the red Mothra text from the other GoodTimes release of this movie. It also uses the same basic image from the Columbia/TriStar release, which looks to be an altered version of this image. Unlike the Columbia/TriStar release, this box includes the text "A Sci-Fi Classic!" and the amusing "An Atomic Blast Releases a Giant Moth that Devastates Tokyo!" on the cover. Thus the image of the citywide destruction is cropped closer to the monster moth on this box.

The biggest difference from the other releases of this film on video is the use of one big shot of the Mothra larva (in black-and-white) attacking a ship, rather than color shots on the other boxes. The synopsis and cast and crew text on the back is identical to that on the other GoodTimes release, and thus includes the same use of the now-obsolete term "Ailenas", and the misspelled "Inoshiro" Honda. Some of the other text has very minor variations from the alternate GT release, however; for example, on this box when listing the length of the film, "approximately" is abbreviated, whereas it is not on the other release, and some of the text below giving information about GoodTimes Home Video has been shuffled or resized.

Mothra (1961)

 Company: Columbia/Tristar Home Video (1993)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

The 1993 VHS of Mothra (1961) features a nice shot of Mothra flying over a destroyed bridge on the front cover. Her colors may be off, but it is a rather nice picture nonetheless. The sides of the release are both the same, featuring a smaller image of the same cover shot with the green text of Mothra in the center. The back features a rather accurate synopsis with only one rather notable mistake, that being the naming of the Shobojin, which are called the "Ailenas" in the synopsis. The back also features three images from the movie, the first being the crew looking at the two twins, with the other two featuring the larval form of Mothra attacking. For some reason, the larva has been recolored green for the pictures.
Credit: Monster Master

Yojimbo (1961)

 Company: Embassy Home Entertainment (1986)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

The cover image to this Embassy release of Kurosawa's classic features a nice black-and-white cropped still of actor Toshiro Mifune about to release his considerable wrath on someone offscreen. The Yojimbo (1961) text font utilized is made to roughly simulate Japanese calligraphy, which also seems to be the aim of the lone green splotch running through Mifune's head. The praise quote on the cover from Variety is somewhat confusing, labeling the movie "one of the greatest outdoor action pictures"--which would imply that there are also indoor action pictures, but I've never heard the genre delineated in that fashion outside of this quote.

The back cover design continues the stark ethos from the front, with a black background and more splotches of pseudo-calligraphic color. Three stills from the movie highlight Mifune again. The synopsis text is rather poor and awkwardly written and gives away the ending. The text also makes the claim that Yojimbo (1961) is parodying a classic Western story--a curious statement since it was a classic Western (A Fistful of Dollars (1964)) that would eventually be made from Yojimbo (1961).


The Last War (1961)

 Company: Video Gems (1985)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

Based on the cover art alone (the Soviet Bear and American Eagle staring menacingly with a nuclear missile between them), it is almost impossible to know that this is in fact a Toho film. Released for distribution in the United States in 1968 (and chopped down from 110 to 79 minuets) by Brenco TV, this is a truly somber "end of world" tale, but it still sports some of the best special effects scenes from the Golden Age of Toho films. The caption at the bottom of the front cover ("An important movie you must see and share") is almost laughable, which is quite something considering this film is anything but humorous, but should not be taken as truth, considering it is fiction after all. The back cover builds tension by giving a very vague description of the film's locations, and finally compares it to other nuclear crisis films such as 1983's Testament and 1964's Fail-Safe. This is an extremely rare find, but can be picked up on the secondary market for a reasonable price.
Credit: Brandon Lusk

King Kong vs. Godzilla (1962)

 Company: GoodTimes Home Video Corp. (1987)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

Probably one of the most common VHS tapes to be included in a kaiju fan's collection, Goodtimes's King Kong vs. Godzilla (1962) sports a watercolored front cover that is so badly done that you can hardly tell who is who in the human crowd. But that really doesn't matter since the stars of the film are the monsters, after all. Godzilla and King Kong seem rather accurate compared to their film counterparts. I mean, remember when Godzilla fired a puke pink beam? Sarcasm aside, it's a rather well-drawn front cover. Moving on to the back of the cover, the synopsis is accurate... until you get to the fourth sentence where it says Kong is revived by a thunderstorm after he gets burned by Godzilla at Nikko (which fans know is wrong). Nevertheless, it's a minor flaw. The back also has a publicity shot of King Kong and Godzilla during the destruction of Atami Castle.
Credit: Fredrex00

King Kong vs. Godzilla (1962)

 Company: GoodTimes Home Video Corp. (1998)
 Country: United States
 Category: Clam Shell

This re-release of King Kong vs. Godzilla (1962) from video distribution giant GoodTimes is an apparent attempt to cash in on the heightened interest surrounding Godzilla that came with the release of the American version; the text on the back even acknowledges that Godzilla "is soon to return to the big screen." However, despite the sizeable banner proclaiming this release to be the "35th Anniversary Edition," this is for all intents and purposes the exact same product released by the company in 1987. Even the sticker on the cassette is identical to the earlier release, all the way down to the 1987 copyright. The only difference is the size of the tape wheels inside, which are much bigger in this newer release.

The cover images are an amusing mishmash, with no stills of the monsters taken from the actual film. Instead, the front includes the familiar green-tinged headshot taken from The Return of Godzilla (1984), which GoodTimes also employed on their video release of Ebirah, Horror of the Deep (1966), coupled with the mug of the 1976 King Kong gorilla suit. Below the floating heads are full-body shots of 1976's King Kong and a color-correct Godzilla from Godzilla vs. Megalon (1973) rampaging through a fiery Japanese city. Oddly, Godzilla is spewing red-orange flame here. The only shot from King Kong vs. Godzilla (1962) is on the back cover, featuring the voluptuous native babe from Farou Island mid-dance, adding on some cheesecake to lure in the male audience. Bizarrely, this shot is black-and-white, while the picture above taken from the original 1933 King Kong has been colorized brown! The synopsis of the movie is surprisingly knowledgeable, connecting Godzilla's iceberg prison to the climax from Godzilla Raids Again (1955). Along with the plot details, the box features an impressively extensive cast and crew list, but obnoxiously includes the common misspelling of the director's name as "Inoshiro" Honda.

King Kong vs. Godzilla (1962)

 Company: Westcoast Motion Pictures (Year Unlisted)
 Country: Chile
 Category: Clam Shell

Making a tremendous effort to top their previous release in terms of bad quality, Westcoast created quite the horryfing tape for King Kong vs. Godzilla (1962). To begin with, the film's title is now Godzilla vs. King Kong. This is due to the fact they used the US theatrical poster for Godzilla (1954) as a cover, deleting every tagline and credit, as well as the "King of the Monsters" subtitle. Kong is added to the mix naturally, with his shot taken from (as you might intuit) a theatrical poster of King Kong (1933). "TERRIBLE EARTHQUAKES...ARTIC MELTS...AND 2 GIANTS MEET", so reads the tagline on the back cover (or what Westcoast intended as a synopsis). Much like Godzilla Raids Again (1955), a poster from Godzilla (1954) is used to fill in the blanks. As for the movie itself, the US version is present here. Instead of using subtitles like before, this time we get captions. That's right, you do get to read "Monster Roars" or "Alarm Bell".
Credit: Hank Xavier

King Kong vs. Godzilla (1962)

 Company: Toho Video (Year Currently Unknown)
 Country: Japan
 Category: Clam Shell

Toho's official VHS release of King Kong vs. Godzilla (1962), this blue-hued cover appears to feature composites, publicity shots, and a thumbnail of the original poster.The only English is in the form of a subtitle: "The King of Monsters, The Record of Great Battles", along with "Toho Video", and the film's English title.
Credit: Baptiste Pujolle

King Kong vs. Godzilla (1962)

 Company: Siren Entertainment (Year Unlisted)
 Country: Australia/New Zealand
 Category: Clam Shell

Siren Entertainment's release of King Kong vs. Godzilla (1962) features a screenshot at the front, while at the rear, an out-of-place still from the Heisei timeline is overlapped by a brief synopsis. The blurb seems to playfully pan the film, an obvious attempt to appeal to non-Godzilla fans on the prowl for random B-movie treasure. As an interesting side note, the stars of the film (as listed on the top right hand corner of the front cover) are the American add-in actors, who really have very little to do except to narrate the events of the plot from a foreign perspective.
Credit: Baptiste Pujolle

King Kong vs. Godzilla (1962)

 Company: Siren Entertainment (Year Unlisted)
 Country: Australia/New Zealand
 Category: Clam Shell

Another release by Siren Entertainment of King Kong vs. Godzilla (1962), this cover features artwork instead of a screeshot. King Kong looks feral and very apelike, while Godzilla resembles a green plastic toy (minus articulated limbs). The rear features a similar array of stills as Siren's other release of this film (Heisei anomaly included), while a similar blurb is utilized. The American add-ins are again listed as the stars of the movie, but right below their names, this cover also mentions Siren's other available Godzilla flicks, listed as: Godzilla vs. Monster Zero; Godzilla, King of the Monsters; Destroy All Monsters; and Godzilla vs. Seamonster.
Credit: Baptiste Pujolle

King Kong vs. Godzilla (1962)

 Company: CIC Video (Year Unlisted)
 Country: United Kingdom
 Category: Clam Shell

For years this video seemed to be only a rumour until a copy turned up on eBay. As you'd expect, this is the US version of the film. We are treated to a wonderful illustration of King Kong and Godzilla standing very high above a cityscape. Both King Kong and Godzilla are the correct versions, so the cover artist must have been given some reference photos. King Kong appears a little more evil thanks to his red eyes! The back cover description makes the most of this "battle of the titans" without giving away too much of the plot. A still of the model-King Kong and model-Godzilla is used on the back as well.

Credit: Andrew Rowe


Gorath (1962)

 Company: Congress Video (1985)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

This cassette is one of several copies of Gorath (1962) released during the 1980s. Unlike the Prism Entertainment copy in this article, this sleeve features actual screenshots from the movie. Interestingly, all the images are sharper and brighter than the movie contained on the tape! The back cover features too more screenshots and a three-sentence synopsis that's entirely correct. Despite mentioning the "International Cast of Players" four times on the sleeve, none of the cast or crew is actually given any credit. A release date of 1967 is given on the back. This appears to correspond to the television debut of the film in the United States. After a theatrical release in 1964, the film was edited even more for TV. The original theatrical edit has apparently never been released on video in the US.
Credit: Cody Himes

Gorath (1962)

 Company: Prism Entertainment Corporation (1986)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

One of the more obscure Toho tapes to hit the states, Gorath's release date strangely enough appears to predate most of Godzilla's VHS incarnations. Containing the edited U.S. version, the front cover basically features a comet on a blurred backdrop. The real eyecatcher is the phrase at the top: "From the Director of Godzilla." The description on the back, oddly enough, attempts to appeal specifically to Star Trek fans; all the while, the synopsis' author tries very hard to hit home the aforementioned director-connection to Godzilla (1954). As for the tape itself, the picture and sound aren't very crisp, but considering there aren't any Region 1 prospects in the near future, this will still prove to be a more than acceptable addition to any collection (if you can find one on eBay, that is).
Credit: Brandon Lusk

Chushingura (1962)

 Company: Image Entertainment (1998)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

This VHS release, which contains two video tapes for the lengthy film, was released in 1998 by Image Entertainment. The overall package design is more or less identical to what the company used for their Region 1 DVD release of the title, taking into consideration that the DVD design is wider in contrast.

Matango (1963)

 Company: Something Weird Video (1996)
 Country: United States
 Category: Clam Shell

Something Weird Video has always been known for releasing presumably public domain titles and, quite obviously, "weird" films. The version of the film included is the American television release from 1965 (which is the same as the current DVD version except for the title and opening credits.) The front cover of the tape is very odd with the title in yellow, outlined in black, against a red background. Below is a picture of the middle-stage "mushroom man" against an odd blue, green, and yellow backdrop with a blood-red splatter partially obscuring it. Below is a color-altered publicity photo of Akira Kubo and Kumi Mizuno. This whole front side is done in a surrealist fashion, somewhat like the movie (though I truly believe the connection is coincidental).

The spine features the title again in black outlined in yellow along with the iconic VHS and Something Weird Video logos. The back cover features a good, albeit blurred, picture of most of the cast (again with a blood splatter effect over the shot) and an obscured photo of Kumi Mizuno. Information about the film and a very brief synopsis appear in yellow font set against a black background, all framed in a blue border with two diamonds. The synopsis is decent, at least getting the plot correct. However, the information included is blatantly incorrect. Eiji Tsubaraya (here listed as a director alongside Honda) is misspelled as "Giji" Tsubaraya. It appears that Something Weird Video made up the alternate titles as well.

However, to top it all off, the production company of the film, perhaps as a way to "evade" copyright laws, is said to be Daiei Studios! Go figure...

Credit: Cody Himes

Mothra vs. Godzilla (1964)
 Company: Paramount Home Video (1989)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover
Apparently the 2nd of 5 Godzilla films obtained by Paramount for release between 1988-1989, this particular cover shows scenes from the film on both the front and back. The 2-sentence blurb basically gives away the ending of the film, while strangely referring to Mothra only in regard to the larvae.
Credit: Brandon Lusk

Mothra vs. Godzilla (1964)
 Company: Paramount/Gateway (1994)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover
The front cover of this release features an artist's rendition of Godzilla and Mothra fighting above the Infant Island shoreline. However, the film's epic battle never took place anywhere near Mothra's home! The illustration of Godzilla is too far removed in appearance from his onscreen counterpart, and vaunts the ever-notorious greenish coloration. The atomic ray is yellow and outlined in red, a far cry from the traditional blue beam. As for Mothra, if you look closely at her mouth, it looks as though she has a bird beak instead of her usual mandibles (although the details are very fine, and could be interpreted otherwise). At the bottom of the scene, some of the natives are cheering for Mothra while others take to the seas in what can only be described as an attempt to help their insectile guardian (as if they could take on a giant monster)!

Each side of the box displays a thumbnail version of the art work from the front cover (devoid of the film's title) and features the recurring phrase, ‘Monster Classic'.

On the back is a picture of Junko Nakanishi, Ichiro Sakai, Professor Miura, and the Shobijin. Centered within a red circle directly underneath is a summary of the film that manages to reveal several important details about the movie (despite its brevity).

Credit: "Kaiser Ghidorah"

Mothra vs. Godzilla (1964)
 Company: Simitar Entertainment, Inc. (1998)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover
Simitar's standard EP release of Mothra vs. Godzilla (1964) boasts exciting, epic, and imaginative artwork that really steals the show and makes this a visually enticing edition to any collection. The rear is dotted with several still shots from the film, showing off the titular monsters and the tiny twin fairies. The synopsis is rather accurate, although the "40-story high" comment as well as the incorrect rendering of Ishiro Honda's name are both flaws worth mentioning.
Credit: Michael Calhoun

Mothra vs. Godzilla (1964)
 Company: Simitar Entertainment, Inc. (1998)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover
 - DIGITALLY REMASTERED EDITION -
Recorded in SP mode, this video features two modest bonus features: an added art gallery and a Godzilla trailer collection. The case displays uncropped artwork that rolls onto the sides and a fleshy background on the rear cover, which pretty much sums up all the differences between this version and the digitally un-remastered release of the same year.

Credit: Michael Calhoun


Mothra vs. Godzilla (1964)
 Company: Simitar Entertainment, Inc. (1998)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover
 - WIDESCREEN EDITION -
Mothra vs. Godzilla (1964) is one of several Godzilla movies released by Simitar in 1998, presumably to cash in on the American GODZILLA (1998). The cover art for this release is less than stellar, featuring a generic green Godzilla and a Mothra that vaguely resembles the Showa incarnation. The title is broken up into two parts, with “Godzilla” in large letters across the top and “Versus Mothra” down at the bottom in smaller print. Two stickers on the box tout it as “The Original 1964 Classic!” and having “Godzilla's Stomp of Approval”. A bar at the top of the cover states that this is a “Digitally Remastered Widescreen Version”. Surprisingly, this is completely true, as it utilizes the same widescreen print as the DVD Simitar released of the movie at the same time. The sides of the case differ slightly from each other: the left side has a small picture of Godzilla, while the right side has a small picture of Mothra. Both pictures are taken from the cover artwork, and both sides display the title of the VHS. The back side has a mostly accurate synopsis, aside from claiming Mothra and her fairies are from Monster Island. Of interesting note is the bonus content on the VHS, which plays after the movie ends and consists of trailers from the Simitar Godzilla movies released in 1998 (Godzilla (1954), Mothra vs. Godzilla (1964), Invasion of Astro-Monster (1965), All Monsters Attack (1969) and Terror of Mechagodzilla (1975)) and a collection of stills from (strangely) Godzilla vs Biollante (1989) and Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah (1991) and the artwork used for their VHS and DVD releases.
Credit: Inferno Rodan

Mothra vs. Godzilla (1964)

 Company: Filmax Home Video (1998)
 Country: Spain
 Category: Clam Shell

A rather nice drawing of Godzilla battling Mothra is used as the front cover for Filmax's release of Mothra vs. Godzilla (1964). Strangely though, Godzilla's appearance resembles more his Heisei counterpart, suggesting the drawing might have been intended for the 1992 film. Nevertheless, it serves its purpose. As usual with Filmax, the synopsis in the back (which labels Mothra as a "Defender of the Country") is quite vague, and we are presented with some stills of the movie as well as a theatrical poster. Full credit is given to the cast and crew. The film is presented in its original aspect ratio, with a decent quality for a VHS. Like other Filmax releases, the only real problem with it is the ear-harming dub.
Credit: Hank Xavier

Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster (1964)
 Company: Video Treasures, Inc. (1988)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover
The artist's conception on the front features a "fuzzy" Godzilla among the other featured monsters. The description on the back references Ghidrah spewing forth "flames", and that Princess Salno of Selgina is from a country "between two worlds", to which I have no idea what they are referring unless it is Earth and Mars (or possibly, it could reference Selgina's struggle to align itself with either the First or Second Worlds from a political standpoint). It's a good thing most people don't read these descriptions before they watch the film.
Credit: Brandon Lusk

Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster (1964)
 Company: Anchor Bay Entertainment, Inc. (1997)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover
As with the rest of Anchor Bay's Godzilla releases from this time, the cover of Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster (1964) utilizes stills from The Return of Godzilla (1984). The front of the case has a picture of King Ghidorah superimposed over a translucent picture of the 1984 Godzilla with flame effects at the bottom and a building in the background. The left side of the case has a picture of Godzilla's head taken from the poster for The Return of Godzilla (1984) near the top with the title of the VHS written down the side. The entire right side of the case is part of the poster for The Return of Godzilla (1984) as well. Each of Anchor Bay's Godzilla releases had a different section of the poster, which, when they were all lined up in the proper order, would form the whole poster. The back of the case has a picture of Godzilla fighting King Ghidorah and a very short synopsis that comes in at a whopping two sentences in length.
Credit: Inferno Rodan

Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster (1964)
 Company: Mountain Video (Year Unlisted)
 Country: United Kingdom
 Category: Clam Shell
This cover uses awful, blue-tinted screen captures to illustrate the monsters on the front and back of the cover. This is complimented with an awful illustration of King Ghidorah, complete with goggley eyes! King Ghidrah's name is misspelt "Ghidra" in the summary at the rear. The last paragraph suggests parents will realise the film is rubbish.
Credit: Andrew Rowe

Invasion of Astro-Monster (1965)
 Company: Topodis Vidéo/D.E.C. (1982)
 Country: France
 Category: Clam Shell
 Supplemental Inclusions: French Poster, French Lobby Card
 - DISTRIBUTION EDITION-
Released on January 26, 1967 in France under the title Invasion Planete "X" (which translates to Planet X Invasion), this video cassette came long 15 years later. As an interesting side note, due to the fact that Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster (1964) was yet to be released, the presense of stock footage from the previous film was all but missed by French audiences. The dubbing is accurate, but the film features about 10 minutes of cuts. Rodan is called Radon, which emulates the Japanese pronunciation rather than the creature's American moniker. The case itself features a minor error in the blurb, where it appears to mention that the P-1 travels at the sub-escape velocity of Mach 1.5, which is less than one-tenth of one percent of the speed quoted in the film.
Credit: Baptiste Pujolle

Invasion of Astro-Monster (1965)

 Company: Paramount Home Video (1988)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

The front features a publicity still of the actual Godzilla and King Ghidorah suits from this movie. The author of the synopsis goes by the common interpretation that the film takes place in the future, and he/she also refers to the title as being a "trip" (although personally, I think the writer of the summary was taking a trip on something of which I want no part). The effects are dubbed as "dated" and "kitsch" (who uses that word?!?). And, of course, Nick Adams is the only hero in this film that can stop the monsters from feasting on human flesh (poor Akira Takarada). The writer of this summary obviously never saw the film.
Credit: Brandon Lusk

Invasion of Astro-Monster (1965)

 Company: Paramount/Gateway (1994)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

Much like other Paramount releases, this box art is extremely nice... that is, if you forget about the badly-drawn, pink Rodan in the background. Also, ignore the fact that there are two people on the cover who aren't even in the film (note Kenji Sahara and Yumi Shirakawa from Rodan [1956]). The back of the slip cover is somewhat bland as it includes a basic white background, one still from the movie, and a huge red circle with the synopsis of the film. The synopsis is weird in itself as it sounds like a personal review of the movie as opposed to an unbiased summary. Quotes like “In this classic, you'll see effects so dated, so kitsch they couldn't call them special” or "Ferocious Monsters that fly, breathe fire and feast on human flesh” would probably make any fan raise their eyebrow in wonder. What could this person have possibly been thinking?
Credit: Fredrex00

Invasion of Astro-Monster (1965)
 Company: Simitar Entertainment, Inc. (1998)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover
Another of Simitar's 1998 Godzilla releases. Invasion of Astro-Monster (1965) features similarly poor artwork to the rest of the releases, with the generic Godzilla (which is gray instead of green this time around), and an oddly Heisei-looking King Ghidorah. As with the Mothra vs. Godzilla (1964) release, this box has a sticker saying it has Godzilla's Stomp of Approval. The sides of the case differ similarly to the Mothra vs. Godzilla (1964) release as well, with a picture of Godzilla on the left side and a picture of Godzilla's opponent (King Ghidorah in this case) on the right side, both taken from the cover art. The back side has three small screenshots from the film and a synopsis. The synopsis is mostly accurate, though King Ghidorah is simply referred to as “Ghidra”.
Credit: Inferno Rodan

Invasion of Astro-Monster (1965)
 Company: Simitar Entertainment, Inc. (1998)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover
 - DIGITALLY REMASTERED EDITION -
This is the 1998 Simitar SP VHS release of Invasion of Astro-Monster (1965). The front features a far more dinosaurian rendition of Godzilla facing off against a rather uniquely illustrated, fearsome-as-ever Monster Zero. This artwork continues onto both the left and right spine, while the back features a greenish, textured background (that doesn't exist on the EP release). This version also includes a "Video Art Gallery" and "Godzilla Trailer Collection" (a universal staple among the "Digitally Remastered" Simitar releases).
Credit: Michael Calhoun

Invasion of Astro-Monster (1965)
 Company: Simitar Entertainment, Inc. (1998)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover
 - WIDESCREEN EDITION -
Simitar's widescreen edition of Invasion of Astro-Monster (1965) is nearly identical to the company's digitally remastered edition. The cover artwork (by Peter Bollinger) is shifted to accommodate the "Digitally Remastered Widescreen Version" banner, and a sentence mentioning the widescreen transfer is also added to the synopsis on the back. The artwork itself is eye-catching and unique compared to other Godzilla releases from the 90s. The green "Godzilla skin" texture on the back is a nice touch.

The movie itself looks very good for VHS, and it's the actual US version, not a recreation using video from the Japanese version like the most recent DVD release. At the time these tapes were originally released, the widescreen prints were something of a revelation to Godzilla fans who had only seen the worn out pan-&-scan prints that had played on TV and released on video. It's also worth noting that while the widescreen transfers on the tapes are identical to those used on the Simitar DVDs, the tapes aren't compressed and therefore look somewhat better than the DVD versions.
Credit: Cody Himes

Invasion of Astro-Monster (1965)

 Company: Filmax Home Video (1998)
 Country: Spain
 Category: Clam Shell

Filmax's cover for their Invasion of Astro-Monster (1965) release uses a memorable production still that depicts the epic battle on Planet X. Godzilla is colored green, although he is not as saturated as in many of the US covers for his films. For some reason, the pupils on Ghidorah's eyes have been removed, making the 3-headed monster look like some sort of spectre. A tagline hails the film as "A sensational cross beetween Kaiju Eiga and Sci-fi"; quite redundant, considering most monster movies are already classified as sci-fi. As usual with Filmax; the back cover provides a rather vague synopsis, some stills, a theatrical poster of the movie, and the full credits. Again, this is a solid tape that is only hurt by the dubbing.
Credit: Hank Xavier

Invasion of Astro-Monster (1965), Ebirah, Horror of the Deep (1966), and Destroy All Monsters (1968)
 Company: PolyGram Video Ltd. (1992)
 Country: United Kingdom
 Category: Clam Shell
The selection of Godzilla films released on video in the UK may not have been the greatest compared to other countries, but what was released was treated with a kind of respect not seen until the Japanese/US DVD releases. All three films make their video debut in this set, and all three are the uncut international versions. Astro includes the scenes featuring Japanese text, and Ebirah makes mention of the Red Bamboo and features the original musical score. Plus, all three are presented in widescreen, though not the correct aspect ratio. The front cover uses a still of Godzilla from Ebirah, the two stars of Astro are on the spine, and various publicity stills dot on the back cover. The write ups on the rear don't get much space, but they are short, concise, and mostly correct (with the minor exceptions of calling the main characters of Ebirah "teenagers" and the Island of Letchi "Devil's Island").
Credit: Andrew Rowe

The War of the Gargantuas (1966)
 Company: Paramount/Gateway (1992)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover
This is Paramount/Gateway's 1992 VHS release of The War of the Gargantuas (1966). The front cover features the Sanda and Gaira battling Maser Cannons. Though the imagery does give the false impression that the two creatures are on the same side, the overall tone of the shot represents well the atmosphere of the film. The rear cover features a relatively witty synopsis, as well as a bit of side info in reference to actor Russ Tamblyn.
Credit: Michael Calhoun

Ebirah, Horror of the Deep (1966)
 Company: Super Vidéo Productions (1980)
 Country: France
 Category: Clam Shell
Briefly re-released in French theaters in the early eighties, Ebirah, Horror of the Deep (1966) appeared on VHS in France around the same time. The front cover of this version shows off the French poster, and on the back, a very detailed summary combs through most of the film's plot. The picture is very beautiful and the original format is respected. The dubbing is quite proficient, but there are some inconsistencies in the names of the monsters. Godzilla is called "Godziya" (as in most French dubbing), and Mothra is dubbed “Mothéa" in this film.
Credit: Baptiste Pujolle

Ebirah, Horror of the Deep (1966)
 Company: Super Vidéo Productions (1985)
 Country: France
 Category: Clam Shell
This is the reissue socaï of SVP's 1980 release of Ebirah, Horror of the Deep (1966). Everything appears to be exactly the same with the exception of the poster on the front cover, which is a greenish hue.
Credit: Baptiste Pujolle

Ebirah, Horror of the Deep (1966)
 Company: Beech Video Productions (1986)
 Country: Canada
 Category: Slip Cover
A faded, dirty 16mm North American television print is contained in this mid-80's VHS release. The only thing worthwhile about this one is that it retains the original green "THE END" card, which is rendered in the same font as the opening titles. New World's slightly retouched poster art for The Return of Godzilla (1984) is used as the front cover, with your typical goofy synopsis on the back (in which the word "gamble" is misspelled). The back of the box lists the runtime as 80 minutes, whereas the sticker on the tape lists it as 83 minutes with a "PG" rating.
Credit: Brad Thompson

Ebirah, Horror of the Deep (1966)
 Company: Video Treasures, Inc. (1989)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover
"Fuzzy" Godzilla strikes again on the cover of this Video Treasures VHS release, where he gazes menacingly at his opponent Ebirah. The synopsis incorrectly describes the entire crew of the misfit rescue team as "fisherman", and Ebirah is referred to as a "crab" rather than the more accurate "shrimp" (or according to this dub, "lobster"). Strangely, there is no mention of Mothra at all in the description.
Credit: Brandon Lusk

Ebirah, Horror of the Deep (1966)
 Company: GoodTimes Home Video Corp. (1992)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover
The cover of GoodTimes' release of Ebirah, Horror of the Deep (1966) has rather good artwork, at least in comparison to most other VHS artwork for Godzilla movies. It features a green Heisei Godzilla standing on the beach, breathing a stream of fire at Ebirah while a volcano erupts in the background. The sides of the case have a small picture of Godzilla's head from the cover art and the title of the movie down the side. The back side has a black and white production still of Godzilla holding Ebirah over his head as well as a color screenshot of Godzilla's head from The Return of Godzilla (1984). The synopsis is pretty accurate, except for Ebirah being called a crab; and it saying Godzilla awakened on his own and saved Ryota and his brother from Ebirah.
Credit: Inferno Rodan

Ebirah, Horror of the Deep (1966)
 Company: HGV Video Productions, Inc. (1997)
 Country: Canada
 Category: Slip Cover
The Return of Godzilla (1984) motif comes out in full force with this release of Ebirah, Horror of the Deep (1966). Featuring an illustration of Ebirah (who appears more crablike than shrimplike here), the case is more or less a carbon copy of Anchor Bay videos. The synopsis on the rear runs through the movie with relative accuracy, with the sole exception being a small faux pas which makes it appear as though the Infant Islanders are actually Letchi Islanders.
Credit: Leslie Hurteau

Ebirah, Horror of the Deep (1966)
 Company: GoodTimes Home Video Corp. (1998)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover
Cashing in on the American Godzilla remake, this release of Ebirah, Horror of the Deep (1966) features a cover that shows off Godzilla (tinted green) and Ebirah locked in a battle. The Godzilla used is the one featured in the later Showa series, and he's firing a red atomic ray. Ebirah looks on from the corner as a volcano devastates the land in the background. The title of the movie is cut into two pieces, the first being "Godzilla" located at the top with "VS. THE SEA MONSTER" at the bottom left hand corner. On the bottom right corner a stamp gives the rather hilarious tag line "Godzilla's Greatest Challenge" in bold. Someone clearly hasn't seen any of the other movies. Both sides of the box show off more of Godzilla and Ebirah and feature the title of the movie with an out-of-place shot of the 1984 Godzilla's head at the top. The back cover has a quote, "...colorful and lively", and then features a rather accurate synopsis that features only one goof. "Godzilla's frequent ally, Mothra." While Godzilla and Mothra joined forces in a movie prior to this one and a single entry afterward (remember, this tape was released prior to Godzilla: Final Wars (2004)), they could hardly be considered frequent allies.
Credit: Monster Master

Ebirah, Horror of the Deep (1966)

 Company: Contracuadro (Year Unlisted)
 Country: Argentina
 Category: Clam Shell

Contracuadro's release for Ebirah, Horror of the Deep (1966) (now called Island of the Red Bamboo), was one of the only Godzilla tapes that would be produced in Argentina (with the other two being Godzilla vs. Mothra (1992) by Transeuropa, and Godzilla 2000: Millennium (1999) by A.V.H.). The front cover pits an earless Gorgo against the 1933 version of King Kong in a rainbow-colored background. No synopsis is to be found on the back; instead, a text reads "A pleasant adventure with grotesque monsters that manage to bring down airplanes". Godzilla isn't mentioned once, and the only clue Contracuadro gives about his existence is a B&W picture (poorly cropped) of the "Megarogoji" costume. There are no credits to the film at all, instead we get Contracuadro's address and number. Such absence of relevant information makes us wonder if the company actually bothered to watch the film, or if they even knew what it was about. The saddest part of all is that we're dealing with a legitimate release, a so-called serious product which manages to do everything except promote the movie contained in the tape. In their defense, the film looks alright for a VHS and the dubbing is not unpleasant.
Credit: Hank Xavier

Ebirah, Horror of the Deep (1966) and Godzilla vs. Megalon (1973)

 Company: GoodTimes Home Video (1997)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

The front cover of this particular double-feature shows off a smattering of false color everything, from the monsters to the environment. Cropped depictions of Goodtimes' previous single-shot video releases adorn the remainder of the box. As for the synopses, there does exist one mistake in the Godzilla vs. Megalon (1973) blurb. The summary incorrectly states that, "The underwater kingdom of Seatopia sends the powerful space monster Gigan, who fought Godzilla to a standstill in Godzilla vs. Gigan [1972], and the giant insect Megalon to destroy the surface world.' That makes it sound like Gigan works directly for the Seatopians, while the truth is that the space cyborg is the kaiju grunt of Nebula Space Hunter M. On the other hand, the summary for Ebirah, Horror of the Deep (1966) is completely correct.
Credit: "Kaiser Ghidorah"

Son of Godzilla (1967)
 Company: VIP Video Club (1978)
 Country: France
 Category: Clam Shell
 Supplemental Inclusion: French Poster, French Lobby Card
Released by Rex International Distribution in French theaters on March 1st, 1978 under the title La Planète Des Monstres (The Planet of the Monsters), this early VHS appeared the same year. The poster features King Ghidorah along with the Moonlight SY-3 (both of which are absent from this film). In fact, 90% of the trailer at the time consisted of footage from Invasion of Astro-Monster (1965). The film is also erroneously credited to Ishiro Honda instead of Jun Fukuda. The rear cover boasts a running time of 120 minutes, while the actual length clocks in at almost 38 minutes shorter. Despite all the errors, the French dubbing is excellent.
Credit: Baptiste Pujolle

Son of Godzilla (1967)
 Company: Video Treasures - CST Entertainment - Video Cassette Sales, Inc. (1987)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover
This 1987 CST Entertainment VHS release has nice, yet somewhat generic boxart. The cover features the title at the top and original artwork of Minilla breathing atomic fire in the foreground with Godzilla in the background doing the same. Unlike some other VHS releases, the film description on the back is entirely accurate. Also on the back is a single picture of Minilla from the front of the box. The sides of the box each feature the same concept: a picture of Minilla from the front at the top with the title running down the rest of the way. As bland as this release might seem, it makes a fine addition to any G-Fan's collection.
Credit: Lone Wolf 117

Son of Godzilla (1967)
 Company: Anchor Bay Entertainment, Inc. (1997)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover
Licensed from American distributor Golden Books Family Entertainment and released in 1997, Anchor Bay's trademark tradition of using stills from The Return of Godzilla (1984) was still alive and kicking for this release. The front features a superimposed 1984-style Godzilla on a Tokyo backdrop, while a composite of Godzilla and his son Minilla decorate the foreground. As with many VHS releases from this period, Godzilla is featured with a vivid greenish hue. His son manages to maintain the truer-to-life charcoal grey tone (likely to show contrast). As for blurb mistakes, this package only features one inarguable inaccuracy: "an army of giant spiders" which would seem to indicate multiple Kumonga's. Naturally (perhaps only by legal obligation), the text ends with a standard-issue one-liner: "Where's Mrs. Godzilla when you really need her?"

Son of Godzilla (1967) and Terror of Mechagodzilla (1975)
 Company: PolyGram Video Ltd. (1992)
 Country: United Kingdom
 Category: Clam Shell
This is quite possibly the most unlikely of pairings PolyGram could have chosen. Son of Godzilla (1967) makes its video debut in the UK, while Terror of Mechagodzilla (1975) is released under its international title 12 years after appearing under its UK title. Both films are the international versions presented in widescreen (the aspect ratios of which are untrue to the original theatrical releases). Terror of Mechagodzilla (1975) contains no cuts, and all the violence is included. This may account for the video being given a "15" rating by the UK censors. To put that into context for non-UK residents, the 1989 Batman received a "12" rating... so this film was considered pretty violent. Son of Godzilla (1967) is given a "U" rating, meaning "universal" (suitable for all). The cover uses some photos faithful to the films, and the back cover plot write ups are concise and quite accurate (with the exception of the Mafune misspelling: "Malfune").
Credit: Andrew Rowe

Destroy All Monsters (1968)
 Company: A.D.V. Films Inc. (1998)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover
A.D.V.'s release of Destroy All Monsters (1968) marks the first and only time the film has been released on video in the US. Thankfully, the box art is absolutely awesome, and completely blows the artwork of pretty much every other Godzilla VHS away. On the front cover, Heisei King Ghidorah looms over Heisei Godzilla, Heisei Rodan, Baragon, Minilla, Mothra Larva, and Anguirus. The tagline at the bottom reads: “The biggest monsters of all time... In their biggest movie ever!” The sides have a still of Godzilla from the movie with the title going down the side. The back has several stills from the movie as well as a section of the famous promotional photo of all the monsters gathered at Mt. Fuji. Most of the “synopsis” consists of monsters' names followed by the city each attacks.
Credit: Inferno Rodan

All Monsters Attack (1969)
 Company: Simitar Entertainment, Inc. (1990)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover
Simitar's 1990 release of All Monsters Attack (1969) possesses what could arguably be considered the worst artwork ever to grace a Godzilla movie in any format. A green Godzilla (which, to the artist's credit, is fairly close to the suit used in the new footage in the film) is holding some sort of weird ant-spider-thing in his hand while a Rodan that looks as though it was drawn by a child flies in the background. In the foreground, a rather disturbing rendering of Ichiro and a Minilla that looks like something a cow would leave in its wake look up at the aforementioned Godzilla. The sides have a smaller picture of the cover art and the film's title. The back of the box has a synopsis of the film which, for once, is completely accurate. Though that doesn't say much considering it's only three sentences long.
Credit: Inferno Rodan

All Monsters Attack (1969)
 Company: Paramount/Gateway (1992)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover
In this Paramount release of All Monsters Attack (1969), under the more familiar (and confusing) title Godzilla's Revenge, Paramount once again employs its familiar "Godzilla movie" design ethos seen on their various other releases. The pseudo-Asian text font (with "shadows") remains the same, and the main image is the easily-recognizable father-son battle with the Kamacuras. I couldn't find an image that exactly corresponded to this one, but the Japanese Son of Godzilla (1967) poster is loosely similar, and I believe there are other promotional photos that are also roughly the same; if anyone knows the precise image from which this painting was inspired (if any), let us know and we'll update this text. Once again, Godzilla is made very green on the cover, spitting fire instead of his atomic ray. This particular design doesn't appear to be closely based on the Son of Godzilla (1967) suit, however. Here, he's too skinny, sports prominent ears, and his nose looks almost human. Godzilla's canines are also elongated, which might infer some inspiration being taken from the original or 1984 Godzilla suits. Minilla, meanwhile, is also spuriously colored green and given more and sharper teeth. His eyes are bright and menacing, unlike the dorky look in the movies, and the "smoke ring tube" effect emanating from his mouth is similar to a number of depictions in promotional materials. The Kamacuras monsters, for their part, look pretty great, although too small. Along the bottom of the image are gathered an unlikely group of people; none of them appear in the movie as pictured here. On the far right, looking up, is a Caucasian male who might be Myron Healey from the American version of Varan (1958), but looks more like Jeff Morrow, the actor from The Giant Claw (1957) and This Island Earth (1955). Next to him is a Japanese pilot, calling to mind Minoru Chiaki's role as the self-sacrificing flyer in Godzilla Raids Again (1955), but his face doesn't match -- he reminds me more of actor Kenji Sahara (Rodan (1956)) from his expression, and that actor actually appears in All Monsters Attack (1969) as the mostly-absent father. Next to him (almost touching his cheek) is a Xilien from Invasion of Astro-Monster (1965), and then the distinctly recognizable actor Jun Tazaki, hiding behind awkward inventor Tetsuo Teri from Invasion of Astro-Monster (1965), played by Akira Kubo, who is getting some attention from his admirer Haruno Fuji, played by Keiko Sawa. Whoever the artist is, he does human faces very well -- even if he can't put them in the right movies!

On the back is the usual Japan flag motif with a green-colorized promotional image from Son of Godzilla (1967), depicting Godzilla and Minilla playing together in a scene that doesn't exist in any movie. The text, as we've come to expect from Paramount's Godzilla releases, is rather goofy but good-natured, calling Godzilla's atomic ray "the ol' zap breath" and nicknaming him "Thunder Breath." The synopsis is mostly accurate, if not very descriptive, but misspells "praying mantis" (as "preying mantis") and, understandably, uses the older spelling of Godzilla's son's name ("Minya") before it was standardized by Toho as "Minilla." The cast and crew list below is respectable, although once again misspelling the director's name as "Inoshiro." Curiously, the Toho copyright is listed on the box as 1986, and it gives the Japanese title as All Kaiju Daishingeki instead of Gojira, Minira, Gabara: Oru Kaiju Daishingeki. It makes sense to render "Oru" as "All" however, since "Oru" is the English word "All" rendered in Japanese katakana and then Romanized back into English; but either way, the title is incomplete.


All Monsters Attack (1969)

 Company: Simitar Entertainment, Inc. (1998)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover

Yet another of Simitar's releases, this time boasting a green-colored, ferocious-looking '84-era Godzilla behind a disturbingly illustrated Minilla blowing radioactive smoke rings. The title leaves much to be desired, using Simitar's familiar "Godzilla" font along with some cheesy throwaway gradient Chiller-esque font. The film synopsis is fairly accurate with three screen caps from the films itself. Overall, this VHS cover is nothing to write home about.
Credit: Shounen_Goji

All Monsters Attack (1969)

 Company: Simitar Entertainment, Inc. (1998)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover
 - DIGITALLY REMASTERED EDITION -

This is the SP release of All Monsters Attack (1969). The artwork features a fabulously rendered Godzilla and a more realistic Minilla (than that which appears in the movie). The differences between this and the EP version are the same as usual for Simitar videos of this time period, which includes the enlarged and expanded artwork, the fleshy background on the rear, and the bonus "Video Art Gallery" and "Godzilla Trailer Collection". All-in-all, this proves to be yet another fine collectible.
Credit: Michael Calhoun

All Monsters Attack (1969)

 Company: Simitar Entertainment, Inc. (1998)
 Country: United States
 Category: Slip Cover
 - WIDESCREEN EDITION -

Peter Bollinger's CGI artwork of Godzilla and Minilla graces the front cover and spines of this widescreen edition of All Monsters Attack (1969). The slip cover is basically the same as Simitar's other editions of the film. The bonus features at the end of the tape are exactly the same as those on the other Simitar tapes as well. The "Video Art Gallery" features some great sketches and illustrations from Bollinger, showing the evolution of his Godzilla artwork from rough sketch to the finished product. Simitar also oddly mixes in production photos from Godzilla vs. Biollante (1989) and Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah (1991). This "art gallery" isn't a bad feature, but without a way of examining the art in greater detail, it's pretty useless here. The "Godzilla Trailer Collection" is self-explanatory. It's nice that Simitar went to the effort to create new trailers for each of its five Godzilla titles, but they're unfortunately very cheesy. It would have been great if Simitar could have included the original US or Japanese trailers instead.
Credit: Cody Himes

Latitude Zero (1969)

 Company: Pacific Video (Hellfire Video) (1994)
 Country: United States
 Category: Clam Shell

This unofficial release of Latitude Zero (1969) has truly one of the ugliest video covers I've ever seen. A distorted black and white portrait of actress Linda Haynes adorns the front cover, while some of the scenery of Blood Rock makes up the background. The title looks like it was printed with the very end of an ink cartridge.

The still on the back cover appears to be Joseph Cotten and possibly Richard Jaeckel. Fortunately, this image isn't nearly as distorted as the one on the front. The synopsis is generally accurate with only a few spelling and grammatical errors. Interestingly, "Ishiro Honda" and "Akira Takarada" are misspelled, although both names are spelled correctly in the opening credits!

Pacific Video is credited as the distributor of this cassette, while the video label mentions a "Hellfire Video".
Credit: Cody Himes

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